From the stunning beaches on the East Coast, to the rugged mountains in the west, a road trip through Tasmania serves up delicious views in every direction.

A road trip through Tasmania is one of the best ways to see the island state. If you’ve got time to spare, a lap of the map is the ideal way to do it, but if you’re pushed for time, or just really want to delve deep into one particular corner, there are a few different routes to take, each as delightful and striking as the last.  

Strap in and turn the key, these are the best road trips around Tassie.

1. A Lap of Tassie

Distance: 1283km
Start point: Hobart
End point: Hobart
Highlights: Port Arthur, Wineglass Bay, Bay of Fires, Launceston, Burnie, Cradle Mountain, Lake St Clair, Bruny Island

 

 

Let’s face it, as Australia’s smallest state it’s not unheard of to just go all out and do a complete lap of the island. If you’re keen to cover a lot of ground and time is on your side, this is a brilliant way to soak in the far-reaching beauty of Tassie. 

Tick off all the big names and see the vastly diverse scenery of this tiny isle. You can start and end in Hobart, or if you’re arriving alongside your car from the Spirit of Tasmania, just start at the top, flip a coin, and let it decide which way you drive first – heads means east, tails for west.

 

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2. The Western Wilds

Distance: 685km
Start point: Hobart
End point: Cradle Mountain
Highlights: New Norfolk, Lake Pedder, Lake St Clair, Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park, Queenstown, Strahan, Cradle Mountain

 

3 Tips To Make Your Next Work Trip A Microadventure, Ken Sanson, Cradle Mountain, Tassie, snow, lake, sunrise

Photo by Kel Sanson

 

The untamed wild west of Tassie is mostly made up of the Tasmania Wilderness World Heritage Area and the staggering mountainous panoramas that come with it. If it’s nature and adventure you’re after, you’re in the right place. 

Find yourself on the banks of Lake St Clair, in the midst of the dramatic Cradle Mountain, and amongst the trees of the vast takayna/Tarkine wilderness. If you have time, there are plenty of single or multi-day hikes to trek around here. You don’t have to see all the scenery through the windscreen. 

Don’t miss the quaint towns of Queenstown, Strahan, Zeehan, and New Norfolk as well.

Read more: 12 Things to do on Tassie’s West Coast

 

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3. Northern Forage

Distance: 539km
Start point: Devonport
End point: Derby
Highlights: Penguin, Burnie, Smithton, Stanley, Sheffield, Launceston, Tamar River, Tamar Valley, Bridport, Derby

 

Photo by S. Group

 

This road trip is a great introduction to Tassie’s abundant food and wine culture and a great place to start if you’ve landed on the North Coast on the Spirit of Tasmania. 

The air up here is officially some of the cleanest in all the world and the produce, some of the best.

Taste the truffles and hazelnuts of Deloraine, check out the cute town of Penguin (and keep a lookout for the Big Penguin!). Tamar River is brimming with history and the adjacent Tamar Valley is overflowing with delicious wineries. For a bit of adventure, head to the Blue Derby trails and try your hand at mountain biking.

Read more: 8 Things to Know Before Travelling Tassie’s North West

 

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4. Great Eastern Drive

Distance: 342km
Start point: Hobart
End point: Bay of Fires
Highlights: Orford, Maria Island, Wineglass Bay, Freycinet Peninsula, St Helens, Bay of Fires, Launceston

 

 

The sweeping and outstretching beaches of Tassie’s East Coast are an absolute delight. This is where you come to unwind and soak in the serenity as you hop your way from beach to beautiful beach. 

Starting in Hobart, turn your wheels north and meander up the coastline, stopping in at Orford to ferry over to Maria Island for the day. Drop into the perfectly balanced Wineglass Bay and wander down the Freycinet Peninsula. Play spotlight with penguins on the beaches of Bicheno before following the coast up to St Helens and the stunning, Bay of Fires.

 

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5. Heartlands

Distance: 509km
Start point: Hobart
End point: Hobart
Highlights: Kempton, Oatlands, Ross, Evandale, Launceston, Deloraine, Mole Creek, Bothwell

 

Photo by Lusy Productions

 

The beating heart of Tasmania is steeped in history, young and ancient. With colonial towns to wander through, farmland to mull over, and lake-lined landscapes that impress, central Tassie is a unique blend of history and nature. 

Starting from either Hobart or Launceston, it’s easiest to loop around the historical villages and towns to land back where you started from within a few days. 

Try a tipple of whiskey at the many distilleries of Kempton and Oatlands before discovering the colonial history of Ross. Take a hot air balloon flight over Launceston and visit the myriad of historical villages a stone’s throw from the city. Soak in the art of Deloraine before visiting Tassie Devils and exploring the caves at Mole Creek.

 

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6. Bruny Island

Distance: 203km
Start point: Hobart
End point: Hobart
Highlights: The Neck, Bruny Island lighthouse

 

Photo by Jason Charles Hill

 

This island, off an island, off an island can be explored in a single day, but why not make it a weekender trip? To get to Bruny Island, drive from Hobart to Kettering where you and your trusty steed can board the ferry and make the hop across. There are very few roads on Bruny Island, so getting lost isn’t really an issue.

Be sure to take a hike to Cape Queen Elizabeth Arch, treat your taste buds at Bruny Island Cheese and Beer Co, marvel at views of The Neck as its flanked by the Tasman Sea on either side. On the southernmost tip of the isle you’ll find Bruny Island Lighthouse shining its light out to Antarctica.

 

How To Get There

 

Feature photo by Ollie Khedun