Don’t pack a halfie! That’s the motto of a new product called FlipFuel that lets you safely move gas between isobutane gas canisters for hiking stoves.

 

The outdoor industry is always innovating, searching for ways to bring more comfort, less weight, and better performance from our camping and hiking gear.

But it’s rare that a product really changes something we’ve all come to accept. 

Jack O’Neill did it in the 60s with the first neoprene wetsuits, greatly expanding the regions that could comfortably be surfed, and GORE-TEX fabric followed in the 1970s with the first breathable waterproof rain jackets.

Nowadays, chances are you head into the bush with a GPS in your phone and on your wrist, how good is progress?

But one thing has been true for decades: unless it’s your first trip, you’ve gotta decide between taking a fresh gas canister, a half full one, or both.

In fact, most keen hikers have a drawer full of them. Not anymore.

 

FlipFuel Flips Preconceptions (and Gas)

The most surprising thing about the FlipFuel Fuel Transfer Device is how simple it is. It looks like the top of two gas stoves have been joined together, kind of like CatDog, and it has a twisty knob just like a hiking stove.

 

 

The idea is that you screw on two partially-filled gas canisters to transfer gas from one to the other. Thus you top one up, before emptying, puncturing, and recycling the other (or using it to top up more canisters).

To make it work requires a little setup. FlipFuel recommends placing the canister you want to empty in the sun, and the one you want to fill on ice. Otherwise the canisters would just balance each other out.

After a few minutes (FlipFuel recommends looking at a mountain while you wait) you’ll screw the canisters on and let the gas transfer commence.

 

Coming to Australia

FlipFuel just launched an Australian site and the product is available to preorder for $51, for a February delivery.

Keep an eye out for a review on We Are Explorers, we’re going to try and get our hands on one to verify if it’s as good as it claims. 

Their reviews page is full of people experimenting with methods to transfer just the right amount of fuel from larger canisters, which could be particularly good for the lightweight (or money) conscious amongst us.

More to come.