Resident outdoor coffee fiend Mattie got his hands on an AeroPress Go to see if it lives up to its claims of being more travel friendly.

As a regular AeroPresser (as we AeroPress fans call ourselves), I was keen to see what the new AeroPress Go would offer that I wasn’t already getting from the OG model. AeroPress are talking up their new design as offering the same great taste, in a more portable package. And you know what, that’s exactly what the Go delivers. But it leads me to wonder, is that all the new model has to offer?

AeroPress Go // Gear Review, photo by Mattie Gould, coffee, gear, packed up

The AeroPress Go packs away into its own cup, nifty!

Smaller = Better. Right?

The new AeroPress Go is exactly as advertised. It’s the same in design and function as its big brother, only a little bit smaller. This might not seem like a big deal, but in the world of camping and hiking, smaller the better is the golden rule.

But here’s where things get a little bit sticky; yes the new Aeropress Go is a bit smaller, but it’s not a whole lot lighter. Especially when you take into account the stirrer, scoop and cup, it weighs in pretty similar to the larger version. And if you start talking about ultralight hiking, it’s definitely not competing weight-wise with the other options out there. Which leads me to wonder, who is the new Go actually for?

Who is the Aeropress Go designed for?

Well, I can answer that right now, it’s for people like me. While I like to go small and lightweight when I can, I’m definitely not an ultralight guy. In fact, anyone packing an AeroPress in the first place (especially when accompanied by a grinder and fresh beans), will never truly achieve ultralight nirvana. 

AeroPress Go // Gear Review, photo by Mattie Gould, coffee, gear

You can’t claim ultralight status if you’re still bringing a stirrer

The new AeroPress Go is for someone that likes to enjoy their coffee outside, but isn’t overly worried about the weight of their pack. Heck they’ve probably packed a chunky period novel and a film camera that weighs more than their tent.

The AeroPress Go is for someone who will be using it at home, out bush, and maybe even at the office. The great thing about the AeroPress isn’t necessarily its size or weight, but the fact it makes great coffee anywhere. So when the office alternative is a pod machine or an instant brew, you know you’ll be seeing the AeroPress Go soon. When I’m brewing up a camp-side coffee, I whip out the AeroPress, and now when I’m getting a takeaway from the local cafe on the way to the trails, I’m probably going to be using my AeroPress cup too.

So what are the real benefits of the Aeropress Go?

One of the most tangible benefits of getting the Go over the OG model, is the bonus of an extra reusable cup. Yeah, it’s great to brew your own cup of joe, but sometimes a barista brew fits the bill, and no one’s using disposable cups these days hey! 

But the reusable AeroPress cup isn’t just for drinking out of. It does a pretty stellar job of keeping your brew kit tidy and together, and the flexy lid makes packing up easy peasy. The real advantage of the packaway cup, IMO, can be found when brewing out on the trails. Packing away the Go into its cup, post brew, means you don’t have to find a bin for your soggy coffee grounds and lets you bring them home for your compost – without leaking all over your backpack. 

AeroPress Go // Gear Review, photo by Mattie Gould, coffee, gear, old aeropress

New vs Old

Another aspect I’m really diggin’ about the Go is the slightly refined lines and curves on the plunger. Yes, it’s basically the same design, but the edges are a little bit rounder and a little bit finer, and I’m kinda into that.

Time to pick some faults

I feel like I’ve been waxing pretty lyrical over the Go so far, and I genuinely think it’s great, but it’s not perfect. The cup does a great job of storing the Go, but it’s a little large in the hand, a little wide in the mouth, and it probably won’t become your go-to drinking vessel.

Secondly, if you already have an AeroPress, the benefits of the Go probably won’t have you rushing out to get one. But if you’ve room in the kitchen, and a bit of cash in your wallet, you probably won’t regret downsizing.

AeroPress Go // Gear Review, photo by Mattie Gould, coffee, gear

1, 2, 3, AeroPress are still pretending you’re making more than a single serve with this thing

AeroPress Go
'If you already have an AeroPress, the benefits of the Go probably won’t have you rushing out to get one. But if you’ve room in the kitchen, and a bit of cash in your wallet, you probably won’t regret downsizing.'
Packability90
Weight70
Ease of use80
Pros
Packs into its cup
Smaller and cleaner design
Cleanly stores used grounds
Cons
Cup is a little big
Essentially the same as before, you don't need both
80